Camp Miakonda Orienteering Trail

 

Read before beginning course

The Camp Miakonda orienteering trail was set up to meet the Boy Scouts First Class requirement number 4a (13th edition).

Please be aware of the following:

  • Scouts should have a good understanding of how to take and walk bearings with a compass.
  • The buddy system should be used at all times
  • The trail is meant for daylight use only
  • Scouts should let their adult leader and/or Campmaster know that they are going on the trail and note the start time. The course should take approximately 1 hour to complete.
  • The paces shown on the sheet are approximate and should be adjusted to the person walking the trail. Each pace consists of two steps, i.e. left/right, left/right equals 2 paces. (see How Do You Measure Your Pace? below)
  • Bearings are also subject to the person sighting the compass, the type and accuracy of the compass, and where the person is standing in relation to the existing marker. An orienteering compass with a base plate is suggested.
  • Upon arriving at the proposed marker location, one must observe that the marker may not be exactly at that spot. Look around the general area for the marker. (see previous notes)
  • Markers are a 1 1/2" X 1 1/2" wooden stakes with a red and white diagonal painted on them. The markers designation is noted on the top of the stake. 
  • There may be downed tree branches you will need to go around. Adjust your path to maintain original bearing.

This course was set up by Rodger Phillips and Tom Hill of Troop 123 in the Commodore Perry District. Any discrepancies or missing markers should be reported to Tom Hill. This course has been revised due to council ring reconstruction. (Oct. 2017)

 

How do you measure your pace?

In order to figure out what your pace is, go to the pace markers on the paved road across from Miakonda Lodge. Looking north there is a marker across from Miakonda Lodge and another one 100’ down the road on the left side.

Starting with your left foot walk in a normal pace between the markers. Every time your right foot touches, you have taken one pace. Note the number of paces you take. Now divide the number of paces into 100’. This will give you your average pace.

For example, if you take 40 paces to go between makers, you divide 40 into 100’ and your pace would be 2 ½ feet. Use this as an average when you walk the course. Walking off a trail, through or around trees and over logs will cause your pace to vary. Keep this in mind when you are walking the course.

File Name Description
How Do You Measure Your Pace (PDF) Download
Miakonda Map Download
Orienteering Trail Key (PDF) (LEADERS ONLY) Download
Orienteering Trail sheet (PDF) Download
Trail Course Instruction Sheet (PDF) Download